Minneapolis Millers

An Underrated Career: Trace Loehr

Few CBL players are as polarizing on the field as Minneapolis Millers long-time shortstop Trace Loehr. A career .233 hitter with a .720 OPS is, some argue, worthy of being a first ballot Hall-of-Famer when he retires, and that drives some fans crazy. Offense is what seems to drive popularity, but Loehr’s body of work is impressive for it’s overall value and even more so for it’s uniqueness. Loehr has won four gold glove awards and likely had a few stolen away as well. After being given the starting shortstop job for good as a 26-year-old, Loehr played in more than 150 games for 8 straight seasons, constantly putting up league leading ZR as a SS. Combining outstanding defense with surprising power and a patient eye made Loehr one of the league’s most valuable players...

Down on the Farm: Checking in on AA

Today we continue our deeper look into this past minor league season by checking in on the AA level, the Southern League. Our first piece covered the AAA level, the Pacific Coast League, and can be read here. Art Wee-Bey, Catcher, Austin Bats Organization Originally signed as undrafted free agent out of the University of Louisville by Erie, Art Wee-Bey was traded as basically a throw-in along with Albert Perez to the Minneapolis Millers. Wee-Bey was then acquired by the Austin Bats from the Minneapolis Millers last June as part of the Alan Alexander, Jesus Arroyo trade. Wee-Bey is quickly emerging as one of the game’s best prospects, and scouts consider his make-up even more impressive than his talent. He projects as a future team captain, and his defensive ability should continue to...

Roque Vela: Meet CBL’s Best Trainer

Roque Vela was the youngest student in his medical school graduating class, at just 21 years old. A childhood genius from Mexico, Vela was always destined to one day be educated in the United States, and was accepted into the University of Michigan as a 15-year-old college freshman. He graduated in just 3 years, and was accepted into the school’s medical program. On May 10, 2004, one month before he would turn 21 years old, Roque Vela had a medical degree from one of the best colleges in the United States. One of Michigan’s most prominent alumni was Dr. Joe Smith, a former orthopedic surgeon who had developed several prominent medical devices over his 20-year-career that allowed him to retire in 2010 at 52 years of age. Joe Smith would turn his massive fortune into the Traverse City franch...

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